CBC Radio

www.cbc.ca/radio

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For better and for worse, Twitter has changed the way most of us communicate with each other.

A new interactive map focuses on the “for worse” part.

It was created by students at Humboldt State University in California. And it tracks the places in the United States where the most racist, homophobic and bigoted tweets originate. It’s called the “hate map” and is part of a larger project called the “Geography of Hate.” To put the map together, the students incorporated 150,000 tweets, and focused on 10 hateful words.

Assistant Professor Monica Stephens leads the research on this project, and we reached her in Arcata, Calif.

Filed under SoundCloud CBC Radio One Interview twitter social media hate map

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rebeccamhass:

This is what it looked like when I spent three days and two nights in the Mojave Desert looking for clarity on the meaning of my life.  Thanks to Awakened Wisdom and Patrick Summers for guiding me and thanks to CBC Radio Ones’ Tapestry and Mary Hines for talking to me about this crazy adventure.  Hear it on demand or on the broadcast this Sunday go to www.CBC.ca/Tapestry or find the link @CBCTapestry

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thelittleactress:

woah, listening to michael enright (love) and cbc’s the sunday edition, and a girl is talking about how hard it is to find work, paid work (in anything, let along something that she’s passionate about) after graduating from at least her first degree and i feel like im listening to myself. it’s a bit scary. i love the cbc and i had left the kitchen a few minutes ago but my dad called me back to hear this. and she just said that she wants to act and now spends so much time searching online job boards to see if there is anything that she can apply to, looking at the criteria and seeing whether or not more schooling would help (credentials) but usually it’s experience that they want. and how do we get that if we can’t be accepted into any job because of our lack of experience…

Listen to The Double Grind to hear these stories of university grads serving behind the coffee counter. 

Filed under coffee barista university

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Of course cats and dogs would listen to the radio!

latimes:

odditiesoflife:

Animals Acting Human, 1923-1956

Ever since photography began, the genre of animals acting human as been a popular novelty. There is something about animals mimicking human behavior that is just too cute. Whether its “Carrots” the rabbit firing table tennis balls from a toy cannon, a lamb and a cat playing checkers or a cat hanging mice like laundry, its hard not to smile.

As it turns out, it wasn’t just the Internet that inspired people to take crazy photos of animals.

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Podcast: Ideas with Paul Kennedy, "Stretching the Canvas"

terresauvage:

From CBC:

“Calgary artist John Will’s greatest work of art may be John Will himself. He is a trouble-maker, scamp, and rapscallion. Jim Brown takes us on a guided tour of Will’s latest: the first-ever visual art show created for radio…. through the life of a bohemian extraordinaire.

Almost every culture has a trickster character.  In many North American First Nations, it’s the Coyote, or the Raven.  For the ancient Norsemen, it was Loki.  The French have Renard the Fox.  African-Americans, Bre’er Rabbit.  And the English have Robin Goodfellow, better known as Puck.

Canadian art has John Will.  

Will is a Calgary artist, noted for his inventive print-making, his painting, and for being John Will.  

He’s been called a scamp, a rapscallion, even Canada’s best-known unknown artist, and a man whose real work of art is perhaps his own life. Or maybe not. Whatever he turns his mind to, John Will does it with creativity and imagination, and a certain willful slipperiness about the boundaries between life and art.”

(Source: terresauvage)

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As a film critic, Roger Ebert was all thumbs — and very dexterous. So much so that he became the first film critic to win the Pulitzer Prize. 
Roger Ebert—pioneer of movie criticism—died yesterday. He was 70 years old. He was best-known for the TV programs Sneak Peek Previews and Siskel and Ebert At The Movies, in which he and sparring partner Gene Siskel would give movies a boost with a thumbs-up, or the kiss of death: the dreaded thumbs-down.
Last night, filmmaker Norman Jewison remembered Roger Ebert on As It Happens. Listen now. 

As a film critic, Roger Ebert was all thumbs — and very dexterous. So much so that he became the first film critic to win the Pulitzer Prize.

Roger Ebert—pioneer of movie criticism—died yesterday. He was 70 years old. He was best-known for the TV programs Sneak Peek Previews and Siskel and Ebert At The Movies, in which he and sparring partner Gene Siskel would give movies a boost with a thumbs-up, or the kiss of death: the dreaded thumbs-down.

Last night, filmmaker Norman Jewison remembered Roger Ebert on As It Happens. Listen now

Filed under roger ebert film critic norman jewison

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sparkcbc:


In many different ways, electronic books are different from their paper counterparts.
But as Peter Rukavina (Hacker in Residence at the University of PEI Library) argues:

[F]or some reason, we’ve opted to acquiesce to a system that takes the regular old model we’re all used to for managing and circulating physical objects and, absurdly, applies it to digital objects.

Back in February, Peter wrote about how he kept fellow Prince Edward Islanders from borrowing an electronic edition of Learn Norwegian - Level 1: Introduction to Norwegian from the public library, in part because the Mac version of Overdrive’s software didn’t allow him to “return” it.

This is crazy, and we must demand better, more rational systems from our library, if only because we’re making up systems and processes here that will be with us for generations.

Intrigued by Peter’s experience, Spark assembled a panel to discuss e-books, public libraries, and artificial scarcity.

On the panel:
Jane Pyper, City Librarian for the Toronto Public Library
Carolyn Wood, Executive Director of the Association of Canadian Publishers
David O’Brien, a researcher at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, and co-author of E-Books in Libraries
We plan to air a shorter version of this panel on an upcoming episode of Spark, but the whole thing was so interesting we wanted to publish it here in a longer form.

sparkcbc:

In many different ways, electronic books are different from their paper counterparts.

But as Peter Rukavina (Hacker in Residence at the University of PEI Library) argues:

[F]or some reason, we’ve opted to acquiesce to a system that takes the regular old model we’re all used to for managing and circulating physical objects and, absurdly, applies it to digital objects.

Back in February, Peter wrote about how he kept fellow Prince Edward Islanders from borrowing an electronic edition of Learn Norwegian - Level 1: Introduction to Norwegian from the public library, in part because the Mac version of Overdrive’s software didn’t allow him to “return” it.

This is crazy, and we must demand better, more rational systems from our library, if only because we’re making up systems and processes here that will be with us for generations.

Intrigued by Peter’s experience, Spark assembled a panel to discuss e-books, public libraries, and artificial scarcity.

On the panel:

We plan to air a shorter version of this panel on an upcoming episode of Spark, but the whole thing was so interesting we wanted to publish it here in a longer form.